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Bradshaw’s Guide

Red Hill

This is one of the most important junctions of the Kent and Sussex Railways.

The Reigate and Reading Branch goes to the west, through the vale of Dorking to Guildford and Reading, communicating thence to any part of the kingdom.

On alighting at this station the traveller will find himself in the midst of the celebrated valley of Holmesdale, surrounded on all sides by elevated hills. To the north appears the great chalk range, bearing a rugged and abrupt front, broken into precipitous cliffs, or crowned with undulating heights. To the south is seen the sand-stone ridge, with the celebrated mount of coloured stone, known as the “Red Hill”.

This station is reciprocally used by both the Brighton and Dover trains, the latter diverging to the east, and we at once enter the valley of Holmesdale, which was noted as the scene of many conflicts in the early history of our country; an ancient couplet, quoted by Camden, evidently refers to this fact:–

The vale of Holmesdall
Never wonne, ne never shall.

The hills to the north seclude both the villages of Nutfield and Bletchingly, which are within an easy distance. Leaving Reigate to the right we proceed across an embankment over Earl’s Wood Common, from which a succession of beautiful and varied scenery lures the eye. On the left we see the Weald stretching far away into the county of Kent, the beautiful building, the Asylum for Idiots, forming a suitable object in the foreground; and on the right Leith Hill, Box Hill, and the downs around Dorking may be clearly discerned.

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