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Bradshaw’s Guide

Brighton to Worthing, Chichester and Portsmouth

Portsmouth Branch

On leaving the terminus the line turns off abruptly towards the east, and passing through the New England tunnel, cut in the chalk cliff beneath Henfield Road, reaches the station at

Hove

The summit of a high cliff in the neighbourhood, called the Devil’s Dyke, is much visited for the fine views it affords of the surrounding country.

cliftonville, Portslade and Southwick stations.

Kingston-on-Sea

This village is situated on the right of the line; it has a harbour and wharf, and is said to be prosperous and thriving.

The line proceeds along the shore, presenting no feature worth remarking, and reaches

New Shoreham

New Shoreham is a borough town and a port, situated at the mouth of the River Adur, over which there is a suspension bridge.

Lancing

Is close to the pretty “sea-side” village of that name, known as Lancing-by-Sea, which is in some repute as a quiet, retiring bathing-place, but it is excessively dull and ennuyant.

A few miles beyond this we reach the more important station and town of

Worthing

This market town has lately become very fashionable as a watering-place. Its rise from an insignificant hamlet to its present rank has been rapid almost beyond precedent, even in the annals of this coast.

The line proceeds three miles further on, and reaches the station at

After which an additional four miles bring us to the station at

Angmering

A short distance to the north is Angmering Park and Michel Grove.

The line still proceeding through a fine and highly cultivated country, passes the villages of Poleing and Leominster, at the latter of which there is a curious old church, and arrives at

Littlehampton

This is the port for Arundel. It has recently attracted the attention of the Brighton Railway Company, who have established a system of steam communication between here and the Channel Islands.

Crossing the river Arun, we then arrive at the station for Arundel, about 1¾ mile north by rail.

Ford

In the vicinity of Tortington, a very pretty English village, with an old Norman church, and the remains of its priory, founded by Lady Hadwisa Corbet in the 13th century.

The line passes on a level, with the open sea on one side and the South Downs on the other, and reaches the station at

This station forms the junction of a short line to

Bognor

Bognor is a pleasant bathing place, with good beach, crescent, &c., and much frequented, the air being very pure, and the situation delightful.

Chichester

A clean neatly built cathedral city and parliamentary borough in Sussex, on the South Coast Railway, 16 miles from Portsmouth.

Bosham. – Soon after leaving this station we enter the county of Hants, and arrive at the station of

Emsworth, a small town at the head of the channel, which forms a part of Chichester and Langstone harbours, and which, when the tide is up, presents a very striking appearance, resembling an inland lake; but when the water is out, little is seen but an assemblage of mud banks, with here and there channels of deep water between them.

Havant

In this vicinity is Belmont Castle, Woodlands, Stanstead House, and Leigh Park; Hayling Island is adjacent likewise, of some importance as a watering place.

The junction of the South Coast and South Western Lines is at Portcreek, between Havent and Cosham, but it is necessary to go to Portsmouth to pass from one line to the other.

Portsmouth

Portsmouth, the first naval port in the British Islands, 75 miles, from London by the South Western Line or 95 by way of the Brighton and South Coast Line.

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Further reading