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Bradshaw’s Guide

Exeter to Torquay and Plymouth

This part of the line is invested with additional interest, from the magnificent scenery which opens on each side as we proceed. There is scarcely a mile traversed which does not unfold some peculiar picturesque charm or new feature of its own to make the eye “dazzled and drunk with beauty.”

Once at Exeter, we have all the romantic allurements of the watering places of the west within our reach, where the possessor of robust health may find a fund of illimitable enjoyment in the rich bouquet, that nature has spread before him on the freshening shores of Devon, and the invalid, those desired qualifications most conducive to a speedy and permanent convalescence.

On leaving Exeter we pass in rapid succession the stations of St. Thomas, Exminster, and Star Cross and in a very few minutes arrive at

Dawlish

Dawlish, one of the stations of the South Devon Railway, is one of the prettiest places along the coast to pass a quiet summer month.

Teignmouth

Teignmouth, three miles from Dawlish, is recognised as the largest watering-place on the Devonian coast; but, from the irregularity of the streets, it is only in the esplanade that it can rival the others before named.

Newton Abbots (Junction)

Here is a stone where William of Orange first read his declaration.

Torquay and Dartmouth Branch

Leaving Newton, we pass the stations of Kingskerswell and Torre, and arrive at

Torquay

Torquay has been somewhat characteristically described as the Montpelier of England, and truly it is deserving of the appellation.

Paignton Station. – The situation of this place is really beautiful, commanding a central aspect of Torbay. Its picturesque church and the sands rounding from it to the fine woods of Tor Abbey, and the town and pier below it, form a pleasing coup d’œil.

Brixham Road station.

Brixham

Close at hand, is chiefly noted for its extensive fisheries, employing more than two hundred vessels and fifteen hundred seamen.

Kingswear, from whence passengers are ferried across the river Dart to

Dartmouth

This sea-port town is situated at the mouth of the river Dart, navigable about ten miles inland.

Totness

Totness is situated on the river Dart. The ancient Roman fosseway forms a prominent feature in this town.

After a very brief stoppage at Brent and Kingsbridge Road stations, we arrive at

Ivy Bridge

A charming spot in the valley of the Erme, much frequented in summer.

Cornwood and Plympton stations.

Plymouth

A borough, first class fortress, and naval dock-yard in Devonshire, at the mouth of the Channel, 246 miles from London by the Great Western Railway.

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Further reading